How your contribution helps:

How your contribution helps:

Partner with us to help teachers and their students.

Give one or invest monthly. Your support will transform entire communities!

$30 will provide books for a child.

$100 will provide teaching materials for one teacher a year.

$200 will provide classroom materials for 2 teachers.

$300 will provide online training for 2 teachers.

$2,000 will allow teacher leadership training and support for an entire school for a a year.

$4,000 will allow you to adopt a school of 900 students.

Help ConnecTeach when you shop for back-to-school supplies

Help ConnecTeach when you shop for back-to-school supplies

You can help ConnecTeach when you shop for back-to-school supplies on Amazon. You purchase and Amazon donates. It’s a simple and easy way to help us in our mission of education for all children.

Please support us:

#StartWithaSmile at http://smile.amazon.com/ch/45-3192080 and Amazon donates.

The Kikulu Foundation + ConnecTeach + Walugogo Teacher Training College

The Kikulu Foundation + ConnecTeach + Walugogo Teacher Training College

This past April (2016) in Uganda, ConnecTeach partnered with the Kikulu Foundation and Walugogo Teacher Training College in an initiative to train more than 350 teacher trainees and more than 15 training college instructors.

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In a country where teacher development opportunities are rare in rural communities, a teacher can spend an entire career without the opportunity to attend professional development focused on teaching and classroom management strategies. In fact, a Kikulu partner Director in Uganda never had the opportunity to attend a teacher development workshop in her 20-plus-year career. ConnecTeach is honored to be a part of this multi-year teacher development initiative and our role in the week-long workshop training current teachers and teacher trainees.

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“I teach because it is the only way to sustain life. It is a part of survival. Pupils become somebody through teachers”
– Walugogo Teacher

Once trainees complete their training and begin teaching, many of them will have classrooms of more than 100 students and will be required to teach with little to no resources. To make matters worse, they do not receive the continuous training they need to be most effective. In fulfillment of our mission to empower educators in the world’s poorest communities, we look forward to our partnership with the Kikulu Foundation and Walugogo Teacher Training College in providing access to professional teacher development to 353 teacher trainees and 17 teachers in rural Uganda.

ConnecTeach is a nonprofit organization committed to breaking the cycle of poverty by equipping teachers with the skills needed to give their students a quality education and lead in the development of the world’s poorest communities. We believe that teachers and students are the most powerful changemakers- locally and globally. Think. Change. Join our movement.

Join ConnecTeach to Discuss Education as a Human Right

Join ConnecTeach to Discuss Education as a Human Right
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The International Conference on Education as a Human Right
Southern Methodist University
Saturday, March 28, 2015
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

The Embrey Human Rights Program, ConnecTeach, and the World Affairs Council Dallas Fort Worth will host international and national experts addressing the critical issues impacting education which include:
•  Poverty and Education
•  Gender Equity and Education
•  Race and Education
•  Disability and Education

Lunch will be provided for $10.00.

Please register through this website link:
https://www.dfwworld.org/IEP/Register

High Schools that would like to attend, but bring a sack lunch instead, may register at NO cost throughjbowden@dfwworld.org.

ConnecTeach partners with CARE India!

ConnecTeach partners with CARE India!

ConnecTeach has entered into a two-year partnership with CARE India to design an accelerated program of English teaching and learning. We will provide training to their teachers and teacher trainers to implement effective instructional practices in three states in India, impacting their Girls’ Education program, targeting marginalized children, in several states. In Uttar Pradesh, our partnership with CARE will help improve the quality of education in over 4,500 schools, reaching over 800,000 children. In Orissa and Bihar, we will help support CARE’s education programs, impacting over 6,500 children.

Impression, Influence, and Impact: Why I Volunteer for ConnecTeach

Impression, Influence, and Impact: Why I Volunteer for ConnecTeach

By Amy Merk 

As confirmation numbers and departure times get set for our second ConnecTeach adventure, I have begun to reflect on what our first trip meant for me. It’s taken me almost a year to realize it, but ConnecTeach really has changed my professional life forever as an educator. In the first month, as I got back and started getting my own classroom ready, the first trip was an opportunity to “give back”, “make a difference”, and use other such well-intentioned clichés, which made a good impression in the faculty lounge. After we got feedback from the teachers we visited, my experience became more than just a conversation topic- I was a positive influence on other teachers. What I didn’t expect was that this week, I would feel the true impact that ConnecTeach has made on me.

If anyone saw me in my classroom that morning before school, they might have thought I had finally lost it. I was giggling out loud as I cut strips of paper, folded them up, and put them in jars.

During March and April, the faint smell of number two pencils on scantrons becomes a stronger and more frequent sense memory. You can see a change in the faculty in many schools across the US. Still dedicated, still determined to engage, but somewhat doubtful. Will I get my students to where they need to be? Will my students’ test scores reflect the growth that I know they have made? The never-ending push toward rigor leaves some with rigor mortis. The brightly colored bulletin boards created by energetic hands back in August have now dulled.

At ConnecTeach, we believe that students should be engaged in meaningful learning. Students should be allowed to develop thinking skills through cooperative learning and multi-sensory experiences. I greet my students with a smile as I try to enact lesson plans I developed based on these very principles. But Tuesday, all I saw all day long were tired, discouraged faces- from my students, from my colleagues, and even from myself as I caught my reflection in a trophy case proudly displaying our test score performance from last year.

And then…Wednesday morning at 4 am- it happened. I jumped out of bed and yelled “I have to practice what I teach!!!!!”

In July, I remember standing in front of a captive audience at the Hope School in Hyderabad, telling the teachers how important it was to empower students to take responsibility for their own learning. We got the teachers up and moving to demonstrate learning as an active process, and that teaching, also an active process, must be an act of constant reflection and growth. “Teaching is an art and a science,” I had told them,  “a profession where creativity meets trial and error.” This was all going through my mind as I got ready for work on Wednesday, knowing what I had to do.

If anyone saw me in my classroom that morning before school, they might have thought I had finally lost it. I was giggling out loud as I cut strips of paper, folded them up, and put them in jars. Ten minutes before the bell, I delivered my gifts. I gave the fifth and sixth grade math teachers each a jar of bad math jokes. By eleven o’clock, I had performed a reminder rap about rules and procedures to 25 sixth graders. After lunch, I caught a student making a flip-book in his math journal during class. Expecting me to reproach him for off-task behavior, he looked a bit puzzled when I enlisted him to make one demonstrating the division process we were learning (he was more than happy to oblige).

I really don’t know how many test scores I increased on Wednesday. What I do know is that I saw about forty more smiles than I had seen the day before. If school is a place where teachers and students want to be, there is engagement. Where teachers and students support each other through collaboration, there is engagement. Where students realize their teachers are also learning, there is engagement. Where there is engagement, there is learning.

ConnecTeach challenged me to do what I am asking other teachers to do. It impacted me as well as many in my school on Wednesday morning in Bedford, Texas, in the same way we hope to impact schools halfway across the world. My work as a ConnecTeach volunteer is the best professional development I could ever have. As we prepare for our second trip, I hope that my fellow volunteers will get to experience this same gift, delivered at that time during the school year when we all need it the most, all for the cost of a few hours of our spare time. Thank you, ConnecTeach, for the impact you make on everyone involved in this project, especially the one you continue to make on me.

Format, Structure and Successful Students

Format, Structure and Successful Students

Teach children literacy skills, they can read a book. Teach children to think, they can change the world.

By Amy Merk

Education must prepare students for their future. If we want students to embrace this unknown future, educators must also embrace it. There is no certification course that can tell teachers what the future looks like. Right now, teachers all over the world are preparing students for jobs that have not yet been created. So how do we do it?

This is the challenge of wisdom over knowledge. This is the challenge that teachers all over the world are facing right now.

The good news is that there are schools where education is being transformed. There are teachers who understand that the format and structure of education must be amended to keep pace with the skills necessary to succeed in a global world. For teachers who serve students with generational economic and education deficits, this shift represents a unique opportunity to bridge this divide.  Since all educators are facing this challenge, teachers of historically underserved students can be invited into this wave of innovation on an equal playing field. ConnecTeach invites these teachers into this conversation on global education, because we are all preparing students for an unknown future.

The Progress of School Education in India

The Progress of School Education in India

Read the full article by Geeta Gandhi Kingdon [Global Poverty Research Group] here.

This paper provides an overview of school education in India.  Firstly, it places India’s educational achievements in international perspective, especially against countries with which it is now increasingly compared such as BRIC economies in general and China in particular. India does well relative to Pakistan and Bangladesh but lags seriously behind China and the other BRIC countries, especially in secondary school participation and youth literacy rates.   Secondly, the paper examines schooling access in terms of enrolment and school attendance rates, and schooling quality in terms of literacy rates, learning achievement levels, school resources and teacher inputs.  The substantial silver lining in the cloud of Indian education is that its primary enrolment rates are now close to universal. However, despite progress, attendance and retention rates are not close to universal, secondary enrolment rates are low, learning achievement levels are seriously low and teacher absenteeism is high, signaling poor quality of schooling.   Thirdly, the paper examines the role of private schooling in India. While more modest in rural areas, the recent growth of private schooling in urban areas has been nothing short of massive, raising questions about growing inequality in educational opportunity. Evidence suggests that private schools are both more effective in imparting learning and do so at a fraction of the unit cost of government schools, their cost advantage being because they can pay market wages while government school teachers’ bureaucratically set minimum wages have large rents in them which teacher unions have fought hard to secure.  Lastly, the paper discusses some major public education initiatives such as Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan, mid-day meal and para-teacher schemes.  The impacts of these massive interventions (and their sub-components) on children’s schooling outcomes need to be rigorously evaluated to learn about the cost-effectiveness of alternative interventions for better future policy making. However, the existence of some of these initiatives and the introduction of the 2% education cess to fund them suggests increased public commitment to school education and, together with increased NGO education activity, gives grounds for optimism about the future, even though many challenges remain.