Help ConnecTeach when you shop for back-to-school supplies

Help ConnecTeach when you shop for back-to-school supplies

You can help ConnecTeach when you shop for back-to-school supplies on Amazon. You purchase and Amazon donates. It’s a simple and easy way to help us in our mission of education for all children.

Please support us:

#StartWithaSmile at http://smile.amazon.com/ch/45-3192080 and Amazon donates.

ConnecTeach at CARE Seminar: Addressing Equity Issues in Education

ConnecTeach at CARE Seminar: Addressing Equity Issues in Education

CARE India’s seminar, “Addressing Equity Issues in Education” kicks off January 29 with an aim to provide a platform for a discourse on highlighting and addressing educational equity issues and challenges vis-a-vis teacher preparation and development; among policy makers, practitioners, civil society representatives and researchers in the region. Leading national and international experts and practitioners will share, debate and discuss issues derived from cutting edge research and evidence based practices. The ultimate goal is to make specific recommendations to promote evidence based practices and teaching – learning processes in India.

Bhavani Parpia, ConnecTeach President, will speak on the topic of Understanding how to Address Issues of Equity through Teacher Education, in which she’ll explore what teacher training models and methodologies are effective in bringing changes in teachers’ beliefs and practices.

The three-day seminar will cover:

  1. Issues of Inequity in our Education system
  2. Getting to the Roots: What are the barriers towards achieving equity in our education system? (Two parallel sessions)
  3. School-based approaches in promoting Equity and Diversity
  4. Understanding how to address issues of Equity through Teacher Education
  5. Addressing issues of Equity through Teacher Support Structures: Sharing Experiences/ Strategies
  6. Towards Possible Strategies for taking forward the Equity Agenda (Two Parallel sessions )
  7. VII. Community Involvement Towards Greater Equity
  8. VIII. Strengthening monitoring and accountability mechanisms to ensure equity targets (Panel Discussion)

“The challenges to achieving equity in education in India are complex and entrenched, but not impossible to overcome. ConnecTeach is thrilled to be a part of the important conversation that will take place at this seminar and we look forward to coming away with a shared understanding of what we must do to achieve equity in education.” said Ms. Parpia.

For Some Girls in India, Adolescence Brings an End to School

For Some Girls in India, Adolescence Brings an End to School

Adolescence brings changes. And those changes exacerbate the struggle to simply survive as a member of India’s most impoverished castes. Sonia Faleiro of the New York Times reports on the struggles of one girl of the Mati Wadars caste whose story is typical of far too many others.

Read the article:  New York Times

The Progress of School Education in India

The Progress of School Education in India

Read the full article by Geeta Gandhi Kingdon [Global Poverty Research Group] here.

This paper provides an overview of school education in India.  Firstly, it places India’s educational achievements in international perspective, especially against countries with which it is now increasingly compared such as BRIC economies in general and China in particular. India does well relative to Pakistan and Bangladesh but lags seriously behind China and the other BRIC countries, especially in secondary school participation and youth literacy rates.   Secondly, the paper examines schooling access in terms of enrolment and school attendance rates, and schooling quality in terms of literacy rates, learning achievement levels, school resources and teacher inputs.  The substantial silver lining in the cloud of Indian education is that its primary enrolment rates are now close to universal. However, despite progress, attendance and retention rates are not close to universal, secondary enrolment rates are low, learning achievement levels are seriously low and teacher absenteeism is high, signaling poor quality of schooling.   Thirdly, the paper examines the role of private schooling in India. While more modest in rural areas, the recent growth of private schooling in urban areas has been nothing short of massive, raising questions about growing inequality in educational opportunity. Evidence suggests that private schools are both more effective in imparting learning and do so at a fraction of the unit cost of government schools, their cost advantage being because they can pay market wages while government school teachers’ bureaucratically set minimum wages have large rents in them which teacher unions have fought hard to secure.  Lastly, the paper discusses some major public education initiatives such as Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan, mid-day meal and para-teacher schemes.  The impacts of these massive interventions (and their sub-components) on children’s schooling outcomes need to be rigorously evaluated to learn about the cost-effectiveness of alternative interventions for better future policy making. However, the existence of some of these initiatives and the introduction of the 2% education cess to fund them suggests increased public commitment to school education and, together with increased NGO education activity, gives grounds for optimism about the future, even though many challenges remain.