Join our Global Giving Campaign

Join our Global Giving Campaign

We have been working fast and furious to launch a district-wide project in Iganga, Uganda. This project will provide leadership training, materials, and support to 1,300 teachers and 30,000 students so that they can have the tools to reduce the rates of HIV/AIDs (which has a current prevalence rate of 15.6%), eliminate domestic violence (which is currently over 70% for ever-married women ages 15-49), and increase the literacy rate (which is at 62% overall and 53% for females).

We have received a huge opportunity to fund this project through a partnership with Global Giving. In order to qualify for membership, we have to show that people are willing to support a project like this through a challenge known as the Accelerator.

If we can raise at least $5000 from 40 donors by June 30, we will be granted a membership, and our project will be featured on their website. Our project will be included in Employee Giving and Corporate Social Responsibility programs run by corporate partners like Microsoft, Ford, and Google. Please go to our Global Giving campaign page to donate and please share the link with friends, family, and colleagues. Just $10 will provide one teacher with classroom teaching and learning materials for one year, and $70 will provide access to our online training course (including much needed internet access) for 50 secondary students.

We can do this! We can give this community the tools and resources to make positive, lasting change happen! Think. Change. Join us!

“Voices from the Field: Education as a Human Right” by Dhara Naik

In this age of development, it was stunning for me to learn that countless children around the world are being denied an education due to their gender, economic status, or they are living in a war torn country. According to UNICEF data, the number of illiterate youths (ages 15-24) is at 115 million, with the most concentrated in the least developed countries and 59% of the illiterate youths being women. Around the world, 91% of youths are literate, but is simply having the ability to read and write equate to education? Learning to read and write is necessary, but should not the goal be bigger than that? In teaching children to simply absorb information and repeat, what will they gain? It is the application, the practice, and the understanding of the “why” and “how” that makes information important. Critical thinking skills are the key to solving the world’s problems; understanding that if children are taught how to think, rather than what to think, is imperative. By doing this, they will gain the skills necessary to improve our communities, countries, and the world. However, if we leave children educationally handicapped, they will not be able to contribute to society, and the issues of poverty, pollution, and violence will continue. This is especially true in regions of the world that are at the highest disadvantage. Providing food aid or money to these regions is simple, but without eliminating the cause of the problems, we are just treating the symptoms rather than attacking the disease.

ConnecTeach is making an effort to treat this disease. By partnering with schools in underprivileged communities, students are learning critical thinking and problem solving skills, as well as learning what they can do to help their community. I was able to do my part by talking to students who were sharing their thoughts on the discussion boards in response to these lessons. In the brief time I spent reading and commenting on the students’ discussion posts, it became clear how a few skills and encouragement can give a student the motivation to address problems in their community and take initiative to generate improvements. For example, one student expressed how she made an effort to discourage her uncle from putting his son to work and rather, send him to school. She explained to him that an education was key to his son’s future and by putting him to work, he was depriving his son of the ability to build an improved life for himself. Her belief in the value of education and, additionally, her drive to bring that realization to her uncle, was exciting. With students like her learning how to reason, finding solutions, and implementing what they already know within their own community, it is obvious that a higher education gives a student the ability to change the world. Although this is just one response and one story, if we multiply the access to this kind of education the impact will be clear.

Though my contribution to these students seems small, I was able to encourage and praise students who were putting in great effort despite the challenges they face. My role in ConnecTeach did not require me to put my life on hold, give up my life savings, or put in much commitment. ConnecTeach is one of many organizations committed to promoting education in an effort to cure one of the diseases of the world, but they require support.  If we all create or recognize roles for ourselves, no matter how big or small, the solution will come about more effectively. It is purely a matter of taking responsibility for the future and realizing that, regardless of the conflicts around the world, we will win or lose together.

Empowering children through education and critical thinking skills is the cure to the diseases that are plaguing our world. We all should be remembered for providing the solutions, rather than the problems. Therefore, it is necessary for government officials, students, CEOs, teachers, scientists, parents, and anyone who values the future of their country or their world, to support education, wherever they are and especially in the places that are the most burdened. While the inequalities of the world may not directly affect you or do not seem prevalent in your country, that does not indicate their absence around the world. There are still people living without clean water, sleeping with empty stomachs, and suffering from treatable diseases and the solution to all of these inequalities is EDUCATION.

An Evening with Rachel Magoola

Rachel Magoola’s velvety voice will fill the room at J. Gilligan’s in Arlington on Friday, June 2, starting at 7 pm. Voted one of the most influential women and one of the top 25 celebrities in Uganda, she will be performing in North Texas to raise funds to support our teacher and student development initiative in the Iganga District.

 

Prepare to dance and donate to a project that will impact over 1,300 teachers and 30,000 students. There is no cover fee, and food and drinks will be available for purchase.

Support of any size will be gratefully accepted.

We hope to see you there!

 

Our Plan for Iganga District, Uganda

Our Plan for Iganga District, Uganda

OUR PROJECT: PROVIDE AN EDUCATIONAL MODEL THAT IMPACTS 30,000 UGANDAN STUDENTS

In 2013, approximately 65 million adolescents were out of school. A third of these adolescents live in sub-Saharan Africa (UNICEF Out of School Children Data Release, 2015).

Fifty-seven percent of secondary age children in Uganda have not completed a primary school education (National Education and Policy Center, 2014). Even more troubling is the decline in the quality and relevance of educational outcomes (see, for example, EPDC Spotlight on Uganda). As a result, communities have little incentive to keep children in school, and those who stay learn few skills to apply what they have learned for the good of the community.

Remaining on the current path will likely result in systemic failure. The proportion of out-of-school children will grow, the skills taught in school will be inadequate and irrelevant, and the efficiency and effectiveness of the money spent will decline.

Our method shifts educational emphasis, broadening traditional academic goals with the development of the skills needed to effectively address real community issues. By adding critical thinking and problem-solving skills, value-based prioritization, greater independence, and self direction to a solid foundation of academic skills, our pedagogy is designed for relevance and lifelong learning.

Our approach sets adolescents on a direct path to relevant and productive careers, effecting desperately needed economic progress within their communities, while exposing and resolving the social issues that are the barriers to progress in the first place: social injustice and exclusion, gender inequity, and poor personal health and well-being.

Our proposal is a partnership between ConnecTeach, and the Menya Zirabanuzale Schools (MZS) in the Iganga district of eastern Uganda. We have worked together before at the WalugogoTeacher Training College, one of the organizations under the MZS umbrella.

Our project will impact 1,300 teachers and 30,000 secondary students from 72 schools in 88 parishes in north and east Iganga.

You can support this project by clicking the “Donate” button or joining our GoFundMe campaign (www.gofundme.com/connecteach4uganda ). Just $5 can go a long way toward reaching our campaign goal. Please share our campaign link with your Facebook friends and Twitter followers.

By helping us, you help us all. 

Thank you.

 

ConnecTeach Speaker Series: Jolly Okot

ConnecTeach Speaker Series: Jolly Okot

JOLLY OKOT

Activist and Producer of The Rescue: The Story of Joseph Kony’s Child Soldiers

Please join us at ConnecTeach World Headquarters to hear Jolly Okot’s inspiring story.

March 20, 2017, 6 – 8 p.m.

8411, Sterling St., Irving, TX 75063

Donations gratefully accepted.

“The change people want to see
in Africa starts with empowering
women…Education is the vehicle
of hope and the instigator of
lasting change.”
— Jolly Okot

 

Jolly Okot has dedicated her life to improving the lives of women in Northern Uganda.

She believes nothing is more powerful than education and
has shared her inspiring story worldwide—from high school
auditoriums to the oval office, Influencing the lives of all
who listen.

By providing women with employment, empowerment and education, Jolly is giving Northern Uganda the kind of hope that will last for generations upon generations.

The Difference We Make

Usha in Hope Foundation Kannagi Nagar describes how Connecteach has made a difference in her teaching and the lives of her students.

Help ConnecTeach when you shop for back-to-school supplies

Help ConnecTeach when you shop for back-to-school supplies

You can help ConnecTeach when you shop for back-to-school supplies on Amazon. You purchase and Amazon donates. It’s a simple and easy way to help us in our mission of education for all children.

Please support us:

#StartWithaSmile at http://smile.amazon.com/ch/45-3192080 and Amazon donates.

Position Paper: “Early Language and Literacy in India”

Position Paper: “Early Language and Literacy in India”

ConnecTeach recommends EARLY LANGUAGE AND LITERACY IN INDIA, A POSITION PAPER. We are proud and honored to have participated in the development of this document that “will enable policy makers and educators (practitioners and academicians) to develop a set of informed actions based upon the principles of language and literacy development in young children.”

The entire document is available here.

Today is #PrimeDay! #StartWithaSmile and @Amazon donates to Connecteach.

Today is #PrimeDay! #StartWithaSmile and @Amazon donates to Connecteach.

Today is #PrimeDay! #StartWithaSmile and @Amazon donates to Connecteach.

Go to http://amzn.to/29Tx1we

Prime Day-July 12, 2016

2nd Annual International Conference on Education as a Human Right

2nd Annual International Conference on Education as a Human Right

The second annual International Conference on Education as a Human Right kicked off Saturday, April 16 in Farmington, NM.

Four panels of experts discussed how indigenous peoples, environmental issues, poverty and gender intersect with education.

ConnecTeach and the Dallas Embrey Human Rights Program at Southern Methodist University sponsored the event along with Navajo Prep.

The first conference was held in 2015 at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. This year, ConnecTeach and Embrey Human Rights Program partnered with Navajo Preparatory School to host the conference near the Navajo Nation in order to discuss the rights of indigenous people.

The keynote presentation was delivered by Zoe Tryon, founder of One of the Tribe, an organization dedicated to protecting the rainforest and the advancement of indigenous rights in the Amazon Basin. She spoke about her experiences working with the indigenous people in Ecuador, including people of the Cofán and Shuar nationalities.

Other speakers included Bhavani Parpia and Amy Merk from ConnecTeach, Farmington Mayor Tommy Roberts, Navajo Nation Attorney General Ethel Branch, singer and domestic violence activist Radmilla Cody, and Jennifer Denetdale, an associate professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico.

As with our conference last year at SMU , this year’s conference highlighted many important issues and initiated important conversations including the balance between preserving tribal culture while changing those practices that serve as barriers to gender and economic equality and environmental sustainability.